Monthly Archives: September 2013

The riddle of autonomous schools: how will researchers crack the code?

Chris Husbands The Riddle of the Labyrinth, Margalit Fox’s hugely readable account of the deciphering of Linear B in the 1940s and 1950s tells the story of half a century of frankly obsessive work by utterly determined individuals. Some 2,000

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Posted in Chris Husbands

Time to re-think the unthinkable: how can we get our research messages discussed by politicians?

Chris Brown The party conference season is a useful barometer for those who champion the more widespread use of evidence within policy making. Among the announcements and denouncements, we start to get an understanding of the gamut of policy positions

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Posted in Uncategorized

What are consultations for?

Dominic Wyse A national curriculum is in part a representation of what a society wants for the education of its citizens. This is why many people feel that wide consultation on its content and ethos is necessary. The proposals for

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The magic of a good science teacher

Sheila Curtis This year more than 35,000 students completed A-level physics. This not only represents a  move towards meeting the need for a more scientifically literate population, it hit the Institute of Physics‘ 2014 target for increasing participation in the

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Posted in Teachers and teaching assistants, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Literacy: the ultimate investment in the future

Julia Douetil ‘Literacy is much more than an educational priority – it is the ultimate investment in the future …. We wish to see a century where every child is able to read and to use this skill to gain

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Posted in Uncategorized
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