Monthly Archives: July 2014

Adult education: a fundamental good

Brian Creese Evening classes were once such an unshakeable part of the British landscape. They were the setting for TV and radio sitcoms, editions of the London guide Spotlight used to fly off the shelves on release and the standard

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Posted in Further higher and lifelong education

Financial literacy is not just about maths: why PISA should rethink its test

Ian Marcouse One mis-selling scandal after another has highlighted how bad adults are at managing their own financial resources. They trust the wrong people and believe in the wrong advice. The ease with which payday lenders found customers shows the

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Posted in International comparisons, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Nicky Morgan: time to read and reflect, consolidate and build consensus

Chris Husbands There are two sorts of politician. There are those who are so passionate about the obvious rightness of what they are doing that they think that everyone essentially agrees with them, and enthusiastically build a large coalition to

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Posted in Chris Husbands

How music-making helps people ‘love later life’

Andrea Creech Age UK has launched a high profile campaign, challenging us to think aboutA how to love later life. Music-making offers a creative and cost-effective response to this challenge. This view is articulated in our new book, Active Ageing with MusicA, through the

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Posted in Further higher and lifelong education

Déjà vu all over again: the endless loop of education policy

Chris Husbands Labour’s shadow secretary of state for education, Tristram Hunt, has begun to flesh out details of policy implementation should Labour win the next election. Speaking to Andrew Marr last weekend, he outlined a plan for ‘super teachers’, a

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Posted in Chris Husbands, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment