Monthly Archives: September 2014

Phonics test: changing pedagogy through assessment

Alice Bradbury If you want to change what teachers teach, should you change the curriculum, or change the assessment? For the last three years, all six-year-olds in England have had to take a Phonics Screening Check test, which they can

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Conflicts of interest in academy schools are symptoms of a wider malaise

Toby Greany This post is co-published with The Conversation As part of its ongoing inquiry into academies and free schools, the Education Select Committee recently published a report that it had commissioned from Jean Scott and me on conflicts of interest in academies. We

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Posted in Uncategorized

Let’s stand up for subjects

Michael Young and David Lambert Each curriculum subject contains a different way of understanding the world. Access to this ‘powerful knowledge’ for every pupil should form the basis for any curriculum. This is the central argument of our new book,

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Posted in Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

What’s so special about running a university?

Paul Temple Is the management of universities much different to the management of other sorts of big, complex organisations? In my new book, The Hallmark University (IOE Press), I argue that it is (or should be) recognisably different – although the best-run

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Posted in Further higher and lifelong education, Leadership and management

Election silly season: is research an ornament, a luxury good or ammunition in a war?

Chris Brown As with many things in our Western consumer culture, research use may be conceived as an act of consumption. Correspondingly, research is often treated by its users as they would a consumer object, much like a coffee maker

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Posted in Research matters
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