Monthly Archives: October 2015

How much testing is too much? Is the 2% solution too strong, too weak or just wrong?

Chris Husbands.  How much is too much? It’s a question we tend to ask when in the proximity of strawberry crèmes, or gin and tonics. One is fine, two could be great, but carry on and it all goes horribly

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching

How to teach Chinese? Is England’s autonomous school system limiting innovation?

Toby Greany. During the early 1990s I lived in China for two years, where I taught English at JiangHan University in Wuhan. Not long before I left, a friend’s dad – a scary documentary film maker who had never given

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching

Has Halloween become ‘Slutoween’ even for toddlers?

Siri Lindholm, Emilie Lawrence, Hanna Retallack and Jessica Ringrose “In the regular world, Halloween is when children dress up and beg for candy. In girl world, Halloween is the one night of the year when a girl can dress like

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Posted in Childhood & early education

Ten sure ways countries can turn away international students

Simon Marginson. The pursuit of global mobility in a world divided up into nations invokes a fundamental dilemma. Free passage without harassment is a right we routinely expect to exercise whenever we travel abroad. Yet the right of people within

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Posted in Education policy, Evidence-based policy, Further higher and lifelong education, International comparisons

The school autonomy debate won’t go away – nor should it

Chris Husbands.  It’s one of the most difficult questions in education policy: how much autonomy should publicly-funded schools have. The debate has been re-ignited by Labour’s newly appointed shadow secretary of state for education, Lucy Powell, and the Chief Inspector

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Posted in curriculum & assessment, Education policy, Evidence-based policy