Monthly Archives: March 2016

The hundred languages of childhood know no age bounds

100 languages

Peter Moss. Loris Malaguzzi (1920-94) was one of the great educationalists of the 20th century. He was a thinker, but also a doer, a council employee who played a leading role in the evolution of a network of municipal schools

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Academisation: a cautionary tale from Holland

tulips

Toby Greany and Melanie Ehren. The schools white paper brings together recent announcements from the budget and the funding consultation as well as the provisions in the Education and Adoption Act to set out the next phase of school reform.

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Posted in Education policy, Evidence-based policy, Schools

Why education policy debates need a sociological voice

Geoff Whitty.  Attending a gathering of philosophers and sociologists of education this week brought home to me how much closer those two groups are now in their analyses of education compared to when I first worked as a sociologist of

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Posted in Education policy, Social sciences and social policy

Social mobility, education and income inequality: an overview in five graphs

  Lee Elliot Major and John Jerrim. The study of education inequality and social mobility increasingly feels like a small world. The British Prime Minister David Cameron hopes for improved educational opportunities for disadvantaged children. President Barack Obama has put

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, International comparisons, Social sciences and social policy

Why les deux sacred cows of the curriculum don’t add up

John White.  I loved the algebra I did for my School Certificate in 1949 – and have never used it since. Ditto for a lot of the geometry. I agree with Simon Jenkins’s Guardian piece on March 10 that we

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment