Monthly Archives: July 2016

Digital Economy Bill: how academic research + government data = a rich mine of information

Alison Park.  Government departments and agencies build up routine information about all of us as part of their everyday activities. Who should have access to these data? Were it not for Brexit, it’s likely that the last few weeks would have

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Research matters, Social sciences and social policy

How does moving house affect young children?

Is the upheaval of moving home detrimental to young children’s development? In a special issue of Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, Prof Heather Joshi and colleagues explore this question in the context of the US and UK. They come to the conclusion that moving home in and of itself is no bad thing – instead it is the constellation of difficulties that contribute to undesirable home moves for disadvantaged families that policymakers need to address. In this blog Prof Joshi discusses the findings, and the potential policy implications.

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Posted in Childhood & early education

Changing the subject: why pushing pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds to take more academic subjects may not be such a bad thing

Becky Allen Today, Sutton Trust published our report on the 300 secondary schools who transformed their curriculum between 2010 and 2013 in response to government policy, achieving a rise in the proportion of pupils entering the EBacc from 8% to

Posted in Uncategorized

There’s more that holds us together than divides us

Kathryn Riley. As a stoic Mancunian, I stagger through the sodden winter streets of Nedlands, Western Australia. My flimsy umbrella no match for the deluge, I take shelter in Morgan Marks clothing store. There is a sale on. Conversations unfold.

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Posted in Leadership and management, Schools

Life after levels: is the new Year 6 maths test changing the way teachers teach?

Melanie Ehren.  Earlier this month (5 July), the Department for Education published the results of the Key Stage 2 test for 10 and 11-year-olds. The publication was awaited with more anxiety than usual as this year’s test was the first one on

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment
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