Blog Archives

What have longitudinal studies ever done for us? A beginner’s guide is here

Alison Park. Earlier this year the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) launched its Longitudinal Studies Strategic Review – commissioned to assess the value and future needs of longitudinal research in the UK. The review clearly recognised the importance of the UK’s

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy, young people

Improving science participation: Five evidence-based recommendations for policy-makers and funders

Science Capital Team.  To continue with science post-16, young people must achieve certain levels of understanding and attainment. Crucially, they must also feel that science is a good ‘fit’ for them – that science is ‘for me’. Drawing on more

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Posted in Employment and skills, Evidence-based policy, Further higher and lifelong education, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Our longitudinal future – providing robust evidence for policy across the life course, from newborns right through to older age

Originally posted on ESRC blog:
by Alissa Goodman The ESRC last week published its Longitudinal Studies Strategic Review, a report by an international panel, which was commissioned by the ESRC to review its investment in longitudinal studies. The panel recognised…

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy

Just how good are academy schools? A new database makes it easier to tell

Bilal Nasim.  There has been huge interest in the performance of schools that have changed from mainstream to academy status in recent years. Since 2010, successive governments have backed the opening of more academies, arguing that they drive up standards

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Posted in accountability and inspection, Evidence-based policy, Research matters

The sweet smell of success: how can we help educators develop a ‘nose’ for evidence they can use in the classroom?

Mutlu Cukurova and Rose Luckin A good nose for what constitutes solid evidence: it’s something a scientist is lost without. This finely tuned ‘nose’ is not innate, it is the result of years of practice and learning. This practice and

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, ICT in education, Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment
UCL Institute of Education

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