Blog Archives

Our longitudinal future – providing robust evidence for policy across the life course, from newborns right through to older age

Originally posted on ESRC blog:
by Alissa Goodman The ESRC last week published its Longitudinal Studies Strategic Review, a report by an international panel, which was commissioned by the ESRC to review its investment in longitudinal studies. The panel recognised…

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy

Just how good are academy schools? A new database makes it easier to tell

Bilal Nasim.  There has been huge interest in the performance of schools that have changed from mainstream to academy status in recent years. Since 2010, successive governments have backed the opening of more academies, arguing that they drive up standards

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in accountability and inspection, Evidence-based policy, Research matters

The sweet smell of success: how can we help educators develop a ‘nose’ for evidence they can use in the classroom?

Mutlu Cukurova and Rose Luckin A good nose for what constitutes solid evidence: it’s something a scientist is lost without. This finely tuned ‘nose’ is not innate, it is the result of years of practice and learning. This practice and

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Evidence-based policy, ICT in education, Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Is PISA still a fair basis for comparison? Some serious questions have emerged

John Jerrim.  A version of this blogpost also appears on the Centre for Education Economics website. The OECD’s PISA study compares the science, reading and mathematics skills of 15-year-olds across countries, with the results closely watched by journalists, public policymakers

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Evidence-based policy, International comparisons, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

How can research truly inform practice? It takes a lot more than just providing information

Jonathan Sharples.  The Education Endowment Foundation’s latest evaluation report, the ‘Literacy Octopus‘, provides plenty of food for thought for anyone interested in improving the way research evidence informs practice, not just in education, but across sectors. This pair of large,

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Evidence-based policy, Language and literacy, Leadership and management, Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment
UCL Institute of Education

This blog is written by academics at the UCL Institute of Education.

Our blog is for anyone interested in current issues in education and related social sciences.
IOE Tweets
Keep up with the latest IOE research

Enter your email address and we'll let you know when a new post is published

Join 34,154 other followers