Blog Archives

What have longitudinal studies ever done for us? A beginner’s guide is here

Alison Park. Earlier this year the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) launched its Longitudinal Studies Strategic Review – commissioned to assess the value and future needs of longitudinal research in the UK. The review clearly recognised the importance of the UK’s

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy, young people

Are Emoji a ‘universal language’? Today is World Emoji Day so let’s 🤔 about it

William Gibson.  What does heart ❤️ followed by ghost 👻, robot 🤖 and LOL mean? What about googly eyes 👀 followed by the peace sign ✌🏻? This is a trick question really because the answer is… it depends. It depends

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Posted in Language and literacy, Social sciences and social policy

Don’t let your cookies leave a trail of crumbs for someone else: why you should care about digital data privacy

Kim Nguyen and Romasha Sanyal Ever thought about how when you use the fingerprint sensor on your Android, you’re actually just uploading a digital print of your biometrics? Or that your Facebook news feed isn’t just confirming what you believe

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Posted in Further higher and lifelong education, Social sciences and social policy

Our longitudinal future – providing robust evidence for policy across the life course, from newborns right through to older age

Originally posted on ESRC blog:
by Alissa Goodman The ESRC last week published its Longitudinal Studies Strategic Review, a report by an international panel, which was commissioned by the ESRC to review its investment in longitudinal studies. The panel recognised…

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy

The changing role of children: should they have more chance to contribute outside of school?

Berry Mayall. Have we gone too far with ‘scholarising’ childhood in the modern world? My new book, Visionary Women and Visible Childhoods, England 1900-1920: Childhood and the Women’s Movement, explores children’s experiences of home and school during the early Twentieth

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Social sciences and social policy