Blog Archives

Grammar schools: why academic selection only benefits the very affluent

Simon Burgess, University of Bristol; Claire Crawford, University of Warwick, and Lindsey Macmillan, UCL.  With the recent news that more than £500m has been set aside by the UK government for new free schools – many of which could well

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Posted in Education policy, Schools, Social sciences and social policy

International Women’s Day: we cannot take progress for granted

Heather Joshi. Is the glass half full or half empty? On International Women’s Day, here are some findings from our research. They point to progress, it’s true, but also to persistent inequality between men and women. The good news is

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Posted in Social sciences and social policy

Housing White Paper offers no hope for young people: here’s what could

Andy Green.  The Government’s new white paper on housing, entitled ‘fixing our broken housing market’, is not going to fix anything except the share prices of the large private development firms. As Simon Jenkins writes in The Guardian: ‘it is

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy

Why teachers in London’s most diverse schools believe Brexit threatens British values

Miri Yemini.  It has now been six months since the referendum results revealed British voters’ decision to withdraw from the European Union, and schools in London are beginning to adjust to this new phase of history. As schools are now

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Posted in Education policy, Social sciences and social policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

 Social inequalities – the report card

Heather Joshi and Emla Fitzsimons . In his speech to the 1999 Labour Party conference Tony Blair compared two babies in adjacent beds on a maternity ward, delivered by the same doctors and midwives but with two ‘totally different lives

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy