Blog Archives

Teacher training and the ‘problem of more’ – how do we scale up without sacrificing quality?

Clare Brooks.  As schools begin a new term, many headteachers are faced with chronic gaps in their staffing. It is at this time of year that the teacher shortage is most keenly felt. At the same time teacher education and

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Posted in Education policy, Leadership and management, Teachers and teaching assistants, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Exams shape students’ future life chances. It is vital to share our knowledge on how we set and maintain standards

Tina Isaacs and Lena Gray.  As we wind down from a relatively calm examination season – even with the introduction of new examinations this year – some of us continue to mull over the idea of ‘standards’ in examination systems.

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Posted in accountability and inspection, International comparisons, Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

It’s time to ‘open up physics’ if we want to bring in more girls and shift the subject’s declining uptake  

Rebekah Hayes.  Despite numerous campaigns over many years, getting more students to study physics after GCSE remains a huge challenge. The proportion of students in the UK taking physics at A level is noticeably lower than those studying other sciences.

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Posted in Employment and skills, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Until the DFE understands curriculum its well-meaning pilots will run off course

Arthur Chapman and Sandra Leaton Gray.  Colleagues at the UCL Institute of Education were very excited a few weeks ago to see that the Department for Education had announced funding for a number of school-centred Curriculum Programme pilots worth £2.2 million. 

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Never has there been such an urgent need for educational research that tackles our understanding of global forces

Douglas Bourn. The impact of Globalisation on societies, economies and political systems has never been greater than it is today. Brexit, the rise of xenophobia and extreme forms of nationalism in Europe and the Trump phenomenon are in part due

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Posted in International development, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment
UCL Institute of Education

This blog is written by academics at the UCL Institute of Education.

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