Blog Archives

The sweet smell of success: how can we help educators develop a ‘nose’ for evidence they can use in the classroom?

Mutlu Cukurova and Rose Luckin A good nose for what constitutes solid evidence: it’s something a scientist is lost without. This finely tuned ‘nose’ is not innate, it is the result of years of practice and learning. This practice and

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, ICT in education, Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

What works? examining the evidence on evidence-informed practice

IOE Events.  The rhetoric of ‘evidence-informed practice’ – or ‘what works’ as it is sometimes known for short – now pervades the school system in England, as it does in many other places.  Through our latest IOE debate ‘What if…

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Posted in IOE debates, Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Is PISA still a fair basis for comparison? Some serious questions have emerged

John Jerrim.  A version of this blogpost also appears on the Centre for Education Economics website. The OECD’s PISA study compares the science, reading and mathematics skills of 15-year-olds across countries, with the results closely watched by journalists, public policymakers

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, International comparisons, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Beyond Prevent: helping students to think critically is a better way to discourage extremism

Mike Diboll and Reza Gholami,  The government’s counter-extremism Prevent strategy has come under serious criticism. Commentators say it risks intensifying the very extremism it is intended to “prevent”. Mounting evidence suggests that it is at best ineffective, at worst counter-productive. Surely, it

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Children’s experiences of classrooms: drawing on the authority of their own voices

  Eleanore Hargreaves.  I was advising my daughter about her education when she remarked, ‘Well, I’m not like you!’ Children may experience classroom teaching in ways that, as teachers (or parents), we have not imagined. By finding out from children

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment