Blog Archives

We could end exam distress by removing the root cause: exams

John White The anxiety generated by school examinations is well-known. Responses to a Guardian call-out in May for views on the new GCSEs produced ‘an outpouring that was overwhelmingly – although not exclusively – negative. The more extreme responses included

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Life after levels: is the new Year 6 maths test changing the way teachers teach?

Melanie Ehren.  Earlier this month (5 July), the Department for Education published the results of the Key Stage 2 test for 10 and 11-year-olds. The publication was awaited with more anxiety than usual as this year’s test was the first one on

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

More than marking: what is ‘assessment literacy’?

Gwyneth Hughes.  Nobody would dispute that teachers should have a high level of literacy and be able to read and write well. But what about ‘assessment literacy’? It is well known that assessment is a tricky business. But being able

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Posted in Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

The headmaster of Eton may be right but so what?

Michael Young I welcome John White’s plan to make contact with Chinese educators uneasy about their ‘success’ on the PISA League Tables and look forward to his next IOE blog reporting his discussions. However, the fact that the headmaster of

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Posted in Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Eton’s headmaster is right: we must break out of exams straitjacket

John White In an article for Radio Times this week, Tony Little, headmaster of Eton, has called the examination system ‘archaic’. He sees it as “little changed from Victorian times”, a hindrance to collaborative working and to education for citizenship. He is right

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Posted in Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment