Blog Archives

School systems are distorting mirrors for the society around them

Chris Husbands.  For any country, doing well in education league tables is – frankly – a mixed blessing. It attracts a good deal of international attention, and in theory it means that your young people should be better prepared for

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Posted in Education policy, International comparisons, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Queen’s Anniversary Prize: a time for reflection

Chris Husbands.  I’ve already written about my own departure from the IOE – leaving, in just a few weeks’ time, to become Vice Chancellor at Sheffield Hallam University. As we all know, leaving one job and starting another is  a

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Posted in Education policy

‘Tragedy of the commons’: how the government abandoned the pursuit of teacher quality

education and the tyranny of numbers

Chris Husbands. The ‘tragedy of the commons’ is a well-known tenet of public, and especially environmental policy. The ‘commons’ refers to a resource shared by many individuals who can use a portion of it for their own benefit. The tragedy

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Posted in Education policy, Teachers and teaching assistants

Subject to change: here we go EBacc again

Chris Husbands. The Education Secretary, Nicky Morgan, has begun to flesh out plans to make the English Baccalaureate – English, Mathematics, Science, History or Geography and languages – all but compulsory for 14-16 year olds in England. The idea that

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Posted in curriculum & assessment, Education policy

How much testing is too much? Is the 2% solution too strong, too weak or just wrong?

Chris Husbands.  How much is too much? It’s a question we tend to ask when in the proximity of strawberry crèmes, or gin and tonics. One is fine, two could be great, but carry on and it all goes horribly

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching