Blog Archives

We need to have a big conversation about the nature and purposes of a university or college education

Francis Green.  Especially since the surge in university and college enrolments around 1990, Britain’s workforce has become very much more educated. The proportion with tertiary (post-school) qualifications has been rising very fast – at roughly one percentage point per year

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Posted in Employment and skills, Further higher and lifelong education, Social sciences and social policy

Why do privately educated people in Britain earn more?

Francis Green.  Private schooling in Britain is unaffordable for the majority of families, but for those that can afford it what do their children get out of paying for education? There are some who say, not much, and that it

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Posted in Employment and skills, Schools

Why job insecurity is bad for our health

Francis Green.  We live in uncertain times. Eight years on from the Great Recession of 2008, and still one in ten workers across Europe is unemployed – that’s 21 million people. Global growth is faltering and in Europe the “Brexit”

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Posted in Social sciences and social policy

What your choice of degree means for your future earnings

Francis Green. The mass expansion of higher education, the arrival of high fees in English and Welsh universities, the ongoing technology revolution and the Great Recession have pushed and pulled the graduate labour market in contrasting directions over the last

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Posted in Education policy, Further higher and lifelong education

Hidden sins of economic crisis: the problem of unhappiness at work

Francis Green When the financial crisis and recession hit Britain more than six years ago, many feared for the loss of jobs. Respectable forecasters expected unemployment to reach three million, as it had in the 1980s era of high Thatcherism.

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Posted in Social sciences and social policy