Blog Archives

GCSE Grade C: too much and yet too little for older students

Brian Creese For most of my years working in and around FE and Adult education I have not spent too much time thinking about GCSEs. Although GCSE re-sits account for a large cohort in the 16-18 sector, we at the

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Posted in Education policy, Further higher and lifelong education

The Ebacc effect pushes pupils into more academic subjects – that’s a good thing

Tina Isaacs  Teenagers across England are waiting nervously for their GCSE, AS and A Level results. Now new figures have shown more of them are choosing to take more “academic” subjects, such as the humanities, languages and sciences, until the

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Posted in Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Re-take that! Why the Government should rethink the role of exams in measuring school performance

Chris Husbands The government’s decision that only the first attempt at a GCSE will henceforth count towards a school’s place in the league tables is sensible. It is a response to widespread gaming of school GCSE outcomes. This has seen

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Posted in Chris Husbands, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

GCSE marking debate: the toughest questions have yet to be asked

Chris Husbands The furore about 2012 English GCSE grading continues. For many headteachers, rightly committed to their own students’ success, the concerns are about fairness and what the results say about the success of their own teachers and schools. For

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Posted in Chris Husbands, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

A new binary divide will not solve the real challenges

 Chris Husbands The blogosphere is bristling with responses to the Daily Mail’s story about the possible return of O-levels. I began my teaching career in the early 1980s. One of my abiding memories – and bitter frustrations – is that

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Posted in Chris Husbands, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment