Blog Archives

Britain’s endless skills problems: why academics and policy wonks need to communicate

Francis Green.  The OECD and the Institute for Public Policy Research came together this week to launch complementary reports on Britain’s long-term skills problem and what should be done about it. The event unfurled in august surroundings, at the offices

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Employment and skills, Further higher and lifelong education

International Women’s Day: we cannot take progress for granted

Heather Joshi. Is the glass half full or half empty? On International Women’s Day, here are some findings from our research. They point to progress, it’s true, but also to persistent inequality between men and women. The good news is

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Social sciences and social policy

Income distribution in times of austerity: why the cuts are likely to widen the gap

Nicola Pensiero. Yesterday, the House of Commons passed a bill that will cut £12bn in welfare programmes. Chancellor George Osborne argues that the government has no choice but to continue reducing the budget deficit. When announcing the plan, he pointed

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy

Why do grammar school systems increase inequality?

Lindsey Macmillan (IOE), Matt Dickson (University of Bath), Simon Burgess (CMPO) The role of grammar schools is still a hotly contested topic in education policy in England. We contribute to this debate by showing that earnings inequality is higher under

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Social sciences and social policy