Blog Archives

Does traditional grammar instruction improve children’s writing ability?

Alice Sullivan and Dominic Wyse.  Children in England have recently taken their statutory tests at age 10-11 (commonly known as Key Stage 2 SATs). The results, published today, show that the pass rate has plummeted compared to last year. This

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Posted in curriculum & assessment, Education policy, Evidence-based policy, Literacy, Schools

Why education policy debates need a sociological voice

Geoff Whitty.  Attending a gathering of philosophers and sociologists of education this week brought home to me how much closer those two groups are now in their analyses of education compared to when I first worked as a sociologist of

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Posted in Education policy, Social sciences and social policy

REF results: what’s the spin and what are the real stories?

Chris Husbands In 1993, Shane Warne, the great Australian spin bowler bowled to England’s Mike Gatting. The ball, heading towards the leg stump was played by Mike Gatting, and then, at the last moment, in a twist of pure genius

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Posted in Chris Husbands, Further higher and lifelong education

Election silly season: is research an ornament, a luxury good or ammunition in a war?

Chris Brown As with many things in our Western consumer culture, research use may be conceived as an act of consumption. Correspondingly, research is often treated by its users as they would a consumer object, much like a coffee maker

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Posted in Research matters

Boyhood: the first longitudinal movie?

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Posted in Uncategorized
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