Blog Archives

Why Britain’s private schools are such a social problem

shutterstock Francis Green.  Private schools tend to be richly resourced and expensive, so those children lucky enough to attend them normally receive a good education, with academic advantages enhanced by a range of extra-curricular activities. But while this might be

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Posted in Schools

What kinds of activities will encourage more students from disadvantaged backgrounds to keep studying science?

Tamjid Mujtaba.  I have worked on a range of projects as a mixed-methods researcher over the years although none as quite exciting as  Chemistry for All,  a longitudinal project funded in 2014 by the The Royal Society of Chemistry. Why

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Posted in Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment, Uncategorized

Education and social mobility – the missing link, or red herring?

This week the IOE held the first in our ‘What if…’ events series, which challenges thought leaders to bring some fresh and radical thinking to key debates in education. We kicked off with education’s role in relation to social mobility,

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Posted in Education policy, IOE debates, Social sciences and social policy

Closing the gap: we need the best teachers in the most deprived schools

Becky Francis.  Our society is stuck in a rut on social mobility – or rather, immobility. For decades, governments of every persuasion have sought to improve social mobility, to narrow the gap between young people from disadvantaged backgrounds and their

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Education policy

The crisis for young people: why housing is the key to social mobility

  Andy Green. Last week’s report from Alan Milburn’s Social Mobility Commission, Time for a Change, provides a useful assessment of the impact of government policies on social mobility between 1997 and 2017. Ranging over policies for the different phases

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Posted in Evidence-based policy, Social sciences and social policy, young people
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