Blog Archives

We could end exam distress by removing the root cause: exams

John White The anxiety generated by school examinations is well-known. Responses to a Guardian call-out in May for views on the new GCSEs produced ‘an outpouring that was overwhelmingly – although not exclusively – negative. The more extreme responses included

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

What can short standardised tests tell us about the attainment and progress of individual pupils and of schools?

Rebecca Allen. Measuring changes in pupil attainment is at the heart of our work as education researchers. It is a practice that is also routinely carried out in schools to monitor pupil progress and teaching quality. One means of doing

Tagged with: ,
Posted in accountability and inspection, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment, Uncategorized

Six reasons why Baseline the Sequel will be a harder sell

Alice Bradbury.  Last week the government announced details of their latest attempt to introduce Baseline Assessment into Reception classrooms in England. As widely reported, this policy will cost £10 million, with the sole aim of producing data on children aged

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Education policy, Language and literacy, Teachers and teaching assistants, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

GCSE and A-level results: it’s not just the grades that matter

Why GCSE and A Level subject choices matter. shutterstock Jake Anders, UCL and Catherine Dilnot, Oxford Brookes University.  A-level results will soon be out, with more than 300,000 students eagerly waiting to find out if they’ve made the grade. Then come

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Further higher and lifelong education, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

How much testing is too much? Is the 2% solution too strong, too weak or just wrong?

Chris Husbands.  How much is too much? It’s a question we tend to ask when in the proximity of strawberry crèmes, or gin and tonics. One is fine, two could be great, but carry on and it all goes horribly

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Education policy, Teaching
UCL Institute of Education

This blog is written by academics at the UCL Institute of Education.

Our blog is for anyone interested in current issues in education and related social sciences.
@IOE_London
Keep up with the latest IOE research

Enter your email address and we'll let you know when a new post is published

Join 33,089 other followers