Blog Archives

Our young people deserve to have citizenship education teachers who are properly trained if we are to close the class gap in political awareness

Hans Svennevig and Sera Shortland. “I want to grow up in a country where the people are more powerful than the government.” This statement was made by 16-year-old Harry in a speech he gave during MP6, a political speaking competition

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Posted in Education policy, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment, young people

Cultural capital and curriculum: will OFSTED’s new framework encourage better education in our schools?

Michael Young. OFSTED’s decision to revise their Inspection Framework to give less emphasis to pupil outcomes and more to the curriculum and ‘the substance of education’ was largely welcomed by the teaching profession. However, implementing such a change was always

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Posted in accountability and inspection, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment

Getting the science straight: the schools minister’s suggestion that private schools convey little academic advantage does not stand up to scrutiny

Francis Green.  A recent report from the Sutton Trust reveals that positions of public influence are still disproportionately cornered by the privately educated, with little progress since their previous report. So the Johnson – Hunt (Eton – Charterhouse) contest to be

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Posted in Research matters, Teaching, learning, curriculum & assessment, Uncategorized

Why Britain’s private schools are such a social problem

shutterstock Francis Green.  Private schools tend to be richly resourced and expensive, so those children lucky enough to attend them normally receive a good education, with academic advantages enhanced by a range of extra-curricular activities. But while this might be

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Posted in Schools

The long roots of childhood, and how they explain economic inequalities across the whole of life

Alissa Goodman. In my inaugural lecture earlier this summer I asked the question, what are the root causes of the economic inequalities in our society, and why have these been so difficult to budge? This is a question that I’ve

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Posted in Childhood & early education, Social sciences and social policy
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